Grounding Club in the Obstacle (Hazard)

SITUATION: Players when competing in a stroke play championship in Bali island at the Nirwana Bali Golf Club, found his ball in the bunker. (Bunker is an obstacle. Soil is covered with grass that limits the bunker, or who are in it, is not considered as part of the bunker. A ball was in the bunker when any portion of the ball touches the bunker). Player A does Address.

COMMON ERRORS: When do Address, Player A club laid on the ground, just as he always did when he was hit from the grass fairway (if not inside the barrier). Rule 13-4 does not justify to grounded his club in a bunker or water hazard. Therefore, Player A should be charged a penalty of two strokes. In match play he will otherwise lose the hole. Likewise, the same penalties will apply if you touch the sand when making a swing-backward (back swing).Words of Wisdom: Be careful of obstacles. This is an area that you have to respect, or you are likely to take risks that can have serious repercussions.

CORRECT PROCEDURE: When getting ready to do a blow recovery from a bunker (or from the water hazard), make sure the club head “hang” above the surface of the hazard. Basic club must not touch the sand, surface water, or any part of the land within the barrier.

NOTE: In connection with the subject of discussion is about the correct procedure, below are other things that may do in the bunker as long as you do not test the condition of the obstacles or improve the location of the ball.

  • You may touch the ground in an effort to keep from falling.
  • You may touch the ground when moving an obstruction-free (for example, aluminum cans, a piece of paper, cigarette butts, etc.).
  • You, or your caddy, may put a bag or an extra club in the bunker.
  • When address the ball, or when you’re doing swing-back, a player may touch any obstruction, grass or other plants with his club.

WARNING:

DO NOT AT ALL TIMES GROUNDING YOUR CLUB IN THE OBSTACLES